Art Contest

To improve impact and engage broader audiences, IGES is currently assessing how to more effectively conduct its student contests.  Therefore, new contest rules and guidelines will be published later in 2015 for implementation in 2016.  If you have suggestions, please send to [email protected].

Since 1996, IGES has sponsored the annual IGES Art Contest for students in grades 2-4. Each year’s contest has a different theme and supports national science education standards. A panel of artists, scientists and IGES staff member judges the entries.

Recent IGES Art Contest themes include “The World’s a Place of Living Things” (2012), “Wonders of Weather: What Do You See?” (2011), “My Place in Space” (2010), “Habitat: Imagine That!” (2009), and “Trees: Making a World of Difference!” (2008). Visit the pages below to learn more about this year’s contest past and view all the award-winning entries.

2014 – Wild for Wilderness

Art Contest

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, this year’s contest encouraged artists to explore the meaning of wilderness.

Read More →

2013 – Animal Collections

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to research an animal collection!

Read More →

2012 – The World’s A Place of Living Things

Art Contest

This year’s contest encouraged students to think and learn about biodiversity.

Read More →

2011 – Wonders of Weather: What Do You See?

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to explore weather. 

Read More →

2010 – My Place in Space!

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to explore our solar system and beyond.

Read More →

2009 – Habitat: Imagine That!

Art Contest

This year’s art contest challenged young scientists and artists to become wildlife investigators by exploring habitats, small and large, in their backyard or around the world.

Read More →

2008 – Trees: Making a World of Difference

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to depict the important role of trees. Whether as habitat to species in a lush ecosystem, as the source of fresh air or as shade for people enjoying the outdoors, trees certainly make a world of difference!

Read More →

2007 – The Ocean: From Top to Bottom

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to explore the world of oceans!

Read More →

2006 – Polar Exploration: Going to Extremes!

Art Contest

This year’s contest challenged young scientists and artists to explore the Earth’s polar regions: either the northern (Arctic) or southern (Antarctic).

Read More →

2005 – Connect 4: Air, Water, Land, and Life

Art Contest

There are many ways Earth’s parts affect each other. This year’s contest invited young scientists and students to think about all of these possibilities and then illustrate how one part connects with another. Or how all the parts connect with each other!

Read More →

2004 – Picture Me! What Kind of Earth Scientist Would I Be?

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to imagine themselves as Earth scientists. There are many kinds of Earth scientists. Some are young and some are old. Some are boys and some are girls. Some work indoors and some work outdoors. And some even study the Earth from space. Some study the land and some study the air. Others study the water or living things. And some study all of those at once!

Read More →

2003 – Earth Explorers: Past, Present, and Future!

Art Contest

People have always explored the Earth. First, we sailed across oceans to discover new lands. Then, we flew through the sky to reach far away places. Today, we launch rockets into space to see Earth from above. This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to think about past explorers as well as present explorers like astronauts and scientists: What do they explore?

Read More →

2002 – The Height of Your Flight Determines Your Sight

Art Contest

Over 100 years ago the Wright brothers completed the first powered flight above the white sand hills of Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Since that time, people have soared into the sky, and then into space, discovering a wonderful perspective of our home, Earth. This year’s theme was: imagine you could fly up above Earth- what would you see? Depending on how high you choose to fly, you could see your neighborhood, city, region, country, or our planet, Earth.

Read More →

2001 – Living Waters…Busy Places to Explore!

Art Contest

The Earth’s water environments, including oceans, rivers, lakes, and streams, contain diverse populations of life, ranging from microscopic organism (plants, animals, bacteria, algae, etc.) to the largest mammal known to have lived on the Earth (the blue whale). While some live their entire lives submerged in water (bass, octopi, crawfish, etc.), others live both in water and on land (sea lions, penguins, frogs, snakes, etc.). They all have adapted in unique and fascinating ways to live in these diverse water environments. This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to submit artwork based on the theme of life in water environments.

Read More →

2000 – Climate Zones and Living Things

Art Contest

Our biosphere contains all of the Earth’s living things (plants and animals, including people) and their environments. These environments depend on local climate, which is determined by factors such as temperature, moisture (including rain, snow, and other precipitation), latitude and topography. For this year’s contest, young scientists and artists were asked to reflect on the link between climate and living things.

Read More →

1999 – Climate Zones and Animal Communities

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to illustrate climate zones and animal communities. 

Read More →

1998 – Cycles of Change: Water in the Earth System

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and artists to depict water’s many roles in the Earth system — as precipitation that falls to Earth as rain, snow and ice; as oceans, lakes, and rivers that provide homes for plants and animals; as transportation routes and recreation; and as what sustains and nourishes crops and foliage.

Read More →

1997 – Cycles of Change: Earth & Sky

Art Contest

This year’s contest invited young scientists and students to depict changes in the Earth and sky.

Read More →

1996 – Art and the Environment

Art Contest

The inaugural art contest invited young scientists and artists to consider the intersection of art and the environment. 

Read More →